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Thomas Hooker

Thomas Hooker

Thomas Hooker was born into a Puritan family in Leicestershire County, England. He acquired a position in Chelmsford, a town noted for its taverns and boisterous citizens, but Hooker's preaching was credited for bringing order. Hooker eventually ran into trouble with religious authorities over theological matters and was forced to flee to Holland.In 1633, Hooker and several dozen of his followers sailed to Massachusetts. John Cotton, one of Massachusetts' leading clergymen, held the position that only church members who owned property could have the vote. Hooker advanced a more democratic view, favoring the vote for all men, regardless of any religious or property qualification.Hooker lost favor in the Bay Colony and relocated to Connecticut in 1636, where he was instrumental in the development of Hartford. Hooker continued to voice democratic principles and aided in the adoption of the Fundamental Orders in 1638, sometimes regarded (with some exaggeration) as the first written constitution. The franchise was given to adult males who had been accepted by a majority vote of their individual townships; this was democratic by the standards of the 17th century, but may not appear that way to modern observers.


Reverend Thomas Hooker, Hartford Founder

THOMAS 1 HOOKER, REV., HARTFORD FOUNDER (THOMAS A ) was born Jul 1586 in Marfield, Leicester, England, and died 07 Jul 1647 in Hartford, CT. He married SUSANNAH GARBRAND 03 Apr 1621 in Amersham, Buckinghamshire, England. She was born abt. 1600 in England, and died 17 May 1676 in Farmington, CT.

Thomas Hooker entered Emmanuel College in Cambridge, England in 1604, where he received the degree of B. A. In 1608, the degree of M. A. in 1611, and entering upon a divinity course he was elected a Fellow of the College, but left the college before completing the first course. After his stay at Emmanuel, he preached at the Esher parish, then, about, he became a lecturer at the Chelmsford Cathedral. However, in 1629 Archbishop William Laud suppressed church lecturers, and Hooker was forced to retire to Little Baddow. His leadership of Puritan sympathizers causes a summons to the Court of High Commission. Forfeiting his bond, he instead fled to Rotterdam, Holland, and then emigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony aboard the ship &ldquoGriffin&rdquo in 1633.

Two of his sisters also emigrated to Massachusetts: Anne (possibly), who married George Alcock in England and went with him to Roxbury, where she died in the winter of 1630/1 and Dorothy (q. v.) &ndash the widow of John Chester &ndash who may have come with her brother Thomas on the &ldquoGriffin&rdquo, but who was in Cambridge in 1634 and did remove to Hartford with her brother.

He settled in Newtown (now Cambridge), where he was chosen pastor on 11 October 1633. He held several lots of land in Cambridge, and in the 8 February 1635/6 list of houses in that town, Thomas Hooker held four. Voting in Massachusetts was limited to freemen, individuals who had been formally admitted to their church after a detailed interrogation of their religious views and experiences. Hooker disagreed with this limitation of suffrage, putting him at odds with the influential pastor John Cotton. Owing to his conflict with Cotton and discontented with the suppression of Puritan suffrage and at odds with the colony leadership, Reverend Hooker decided to remove from Massachusetts, taking his flock with him.

Gov. Winthrop&rsquos Journal, dated 5 October 1635, states: &ldquoabout sixty men, women and little children, went by land toward Connecticut with their cows, horses and swine, and after a tedious and difficult journey arrived safe there&rdquo, thus establishing a new colony in Connecticut, first called Newtown, changed soon after to Hartford.

Thomas Hooker played a significant role in the creation of &ldquothe Fundamental Orders of Connecticut&rdquo. This document is one of the modern world's first written constitutions and was a primary influence upon the current American Constitution, written nearly a century and a half later.

On May 31, 1638, when a new form of government was under consideration, Hooker preached a sermon, in which he laid down the doctrines that &ldquothe choice of public magistrates belongs unto the people by Gods own allowance,&rdquo and that &ldquothey who have the power to appoint officers and magistrates, it is in their power, also, to set bounds and limitations of the power and place unto which they call them,&rdquo because &ldquothe foundation of authority is laid, firstly, in the free consent of the people.&rdquo

In the Hartford land inventory of February 1639/40 held: two acres on which his dwelling house stood with other outhouses, yards, gardens or orchards located on the road on the north bank of the Little River twenty acres in the Old Oxpasture fourteen acres and two roods in the South Meadow eleven acres in the Forty Acres twenty-two acres in the swamp by the Great River twenty acres lying in Hockanum one acre and three roods in the Little Meadow twenty-four acres in the Cow Pasture and twenty-four acres of woodland in the Bridge Field. He later acquired an additional five parcels of land.

Frank Shuffleton wrote a comprehensive biography on him: &ldquoThomas Hooker: 1586 to 1647&rdquo, Princeton, 1977

Genealogy: &ldquoThe Descendants of the Rev. Thomas Hooker&rdquo, Edward Hooker, Rochester, NY, 1909 (This is a dated genealogy, in which the author gets the ancestry of Thomas Hooker wrong, and is lacking in the citation of sources. However, most of the data presented crosschecks fairly well with other genealogies and primary sources.)


Barbey, best known as Tom Hooker, was brought to Europe when he was six months old. At the age of ten, he started his musical career as a drummer. At 13, he created his first band. At 15, he first appeared in public at a concert as a drummer/singer. He studied languages in Switzerland.

In 1980, he moved to Italy, where he was discovered by Italian producers. His first hit was "Flip Over", b/w the track "We Can Start It All Over Again". He had his first major success in 1986 with "Looking for Love". His later work included collaborations with several other artists and producers, including Eddy Huntington, for whom he provided several lyrics and backing vocals, including those for the Europe-wide hit "U.S.S.R.". [3]

By 1988, he moved to photography and his music style changed with his single "No More Heaven". His last single was "Run Away", which was a commercial failure.

Hooker co-wrote and sang lead vocals on the first two Den Harrow albums, backing vocals on the third album and co-wrote many subsequent Den Harrow songs under the name T. Beecher. When Hooker was credited for vocals at all, it was only for background vocals, as it was the producer's intention to have the lip-synching model Stefano Zandri as the public face of the project.

In 2010, Tom Hooker recorded and published on YouTube a press conference-style video in which Hooker, flanked by Den Harrow co-producer Miki Chierigato, states and demonstrates that he was the vocalist on most of the Den Harrow records, and in which he accuses Stefano Zandri of continuing to publicly lip synch to those recordings. He also states that Zandri made threats and insults against Hooker and his family on Facebook for exposing the vocal inauthenticity of the Den Harrow recordings. Hooker asserts that Zandri no longer has permission to publicly lip sync to Den Harrow recordings that use Tom Hooker's voice. [2]

In 1994, Hooker left the music scene to move to America to marry Suzanne Berquist. He eventually moved to Los Angeles and changed his name to Thomas Barbey, his mother's maiden name. He began a career as a visual artist, creating surreal photomontages. He currently exhibits in galleries in many countries around the world.

In October 2010, Hooker collaborated with his longtime musical colleague and fellow composer, Miki Chieregato, to produce and release a brand new single and video, "Change Your Mind". This collaboration marks the return to the roots of the same production team that was responsible for all of the initial Den Harrow and Tom Hooker output between 1985 and 1988. In 2011, Hooker released a new recording and music video of the Den Harrow track "Future Brain", which features himself.


Thomas Hooker was a Puritan preacher who left England under persecution and settled in Massachusetts. His congregation was unhappy in Massachusetts, though, and in June 1636 Hooker led about a hundred people to Hartford, Connecticut. About a year later they formed their own government. At the opening session of the General Court, on this day 31 May, 1638, Hooker preached a sermon that many historians see as the impulse for the colony&rsquos Fundamental Orders, the modern world&rsquos first written constitution, adopted in January 1639. We do not have the complete sermon, but only notes by Henry Wolcott, Jr. Those notes show a typical Puritan arrangement, in which appear doctrinal statements drawn from scripture, reasons to back up doctrinal assertions, and uses to which the teaching should be put. Today&rsquos excerpt is adapted from a transcription made by Douglas Shepherd.

&ldquoTEXT: Deuteronomy 1:13 &lsquoTake you wise men, and understanding, and known among your tribes, and I will make them rulers over you.&rsquo [also v. 15, &lsquoSo I took the chief of your tribes, wise men, and known, and made them heads over you, captains over thousands, and captains over hundreds, and captains over fifties, and captains over tens, and officers among your tribes.&rsquo]

&ldquo1ST DOCTRINAL STATEMENT: The choice of public magistrates belongs unto the people by God&rsquos own allowance

&ldquo2ND DOCTRINAL STATEMENT: The privilege of election which belongs to the people must not be exercised according to their whims but according to the blessed will and law of God.

&ldquo3RD DOCTRINAL STATEMENT: Those who have power to appoint officers and magistrates have it in their power also to set the bounds and limits of the power and places unto which they call them.

&ldquo1ST REASON: Because the foundation of authority is laid firstly in the free consent of people.

&ldquo2ND REASON: Because by a free choice the hearts of the people will be more inclined to the love of the persons and more ready to? yield obedience.

&ldquo3RD REASON: Because of that duty and engagement of the people.

&ldquoUSE 1 Here is matter of thankful acknowledgement in the apprehension of Gods faithfulness towards us and the promotion of those mercies that God doth command and vouchsafe

&ldquoUSE 2 Reproof to dash the conceits of all those that shall oppose it.

&ldquoUSE 3 Exhortation to persuade us as God hath given us liberty to take it

&ldquoDOCTRINAL STATEMENT: That the wants of all creatures in general and of man in particular are great and numberless

&ldquoUSE 4 What course we should take to supply our great wants.&rdquo

Fiske, John. The Beginnings of New England: Or the Puritan Theocracy in its Relations to Civil and Religious Liberty. St. Louis, 1889.


Pastor Morgan reflects on Thomas Hooker’s Deuteronomy sermon naming him ‘Father of Democracy’

Fox Nation explores 100 Bible verses that inspired American history

Teaching Pastor Robert J. Morgan breaks down the history of 17th-century preacher Thomas Hooker and his sermon that shaped America as we know it in a new episode of Fox Nation’s "100 Bible Verses That Made America."

After fleeing from England in disguise, Hooker settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was considered one of the greatest preachers of his time, and advocated for the extension of the right to vote.

Hooker and his congregation migrated south, after facing scrutiny for his Puritan beliefs, on May 31, 1638, to establish the Connecticut-based city of Hartford. There, he famously preached a sermon known as Deuteronomy 1:13 which was considered one of the most important messages in New England history.

"Choose wise, understanding, and knowledgeable men from among your tribes, and I will make them heads over you," the sermon read.

"The word of God requires that to maintain the peace and union of such a people, there should be an orderly and decent government established according to God to order and dispose of the phrase of the people at all seasons as occasions shall require."

Historians say Hooker’s influence led to the founding of Connecticut’s new Constitution – The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut – which ultimately paved the way for the United States Constitution.

"The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut represent the beginnings of democracy in America," Morgan explained. "Some have called Hooker the father of democracy and his ideas were firmly rooted in the priesthood of the believer based on the gospel of Christ."

JoinFox Nation today for more episodes of "100 Bible Verses That Made America" and other great content.

Fox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from your favorite Fox News personalities.


Thomas Hooker

Thomas Hooker (1586–1647) was a prominent Puritan colonial leader, who founded the colony of Connecticut after dissenting with Puritan leaders in Massachusetts. He was known as an outstanding speaker and a leader of universal Christian suffrage.

Called today “the Father of Connecticut,” Thomas Hooker was a towering figure in the early development of colonial New England. He was one of the great preachers of his time, an erudite writer on Christian subjects, the first minister of Cambridge, Massachusetts, one of the first settlers and founders of both the city of Hartford and the state of Connecticut, and cited by many as the inspiration for the “Fundamental Orders of Connecticut,” cited by some as the world’s first written democratic constitution that established a representative government.

Most likely coming out of the county of Leicestershire, in the East Midlands region, the Hooker family was prominent at least as far back as the reign of Henry VIII. There is known to have been a great Hooker family in Devon, well-known throughout Southern England. The Devon branch produced the great theologian and clergyman, the Rev. Richard Hooker.

Thomas Hooker was likely born at Marefield or Birstall, Leicestershire, and went to school at Market Bosworth. He received his Bachelors of Arts from Emmanuel College, Cambridge in 1608, continuing there to earn his Masters of Arts in 1611. He stayed at Emmanuel as a fellow for a few years. After his stay at Emmanuel, Hooker preached at the Esher parish, where he earned a reputation as an excellent speaker.

Around 1626, Hooker became a lecturer at the Chelmsford Cathedral. However, in 1629 Archbishop William Laud suppressed church lecturers, and Hooker was forced to retire to Little Baddow. His leadership of Puritan sympathizers brought him a summons to the Court of High Commission. Forfeiting his bond, Hooker fled to Rotterdam, Holland, and from there immigrated to Massachusetts Bay Colony aboard the Griffin.

Hooker arrived in Boston and settled in Newtown (later renamed Cambridge), where he became the pastor of the First Parish Church. His parish became known as “Mr. Hooker’s Company”.

Voting in Massachusetts was limited to freemen, individuals who had been formally admitted to their church after a detailed interrogation of their religious views and experiences. Hooker disagreed with this limitation of suffrage, putting him at odds with the influential pastor John Cotton. Owing to his conflict with Cotton and discontented with the suppression of Puritansuffrage and at odds with the colony leadership, Hooker and the Rev. Samuel Stone led a group of about 100 who, in 1636, founded the settlement of Hartford, named for Stone’s place of birth: Hertford, in England.

This led to the founding of the Connecticut Colony. Hooker became more active in politics in Connecticut. The General Court representing Wethersfield, Windsor, and Hartford met at the end of May 1638 to frame a written constitution in order to establish a government for the commonwealth. Hooker preached the opening sermon at First Church of Hartford on May 31, declaring that “the foundation of authority is laid in the free consent of the people.”

On January 14, 1639, freemen from these three settlements ratified the “Fundamental Orders of Connecticut” in what John Fiske called “the first written constitution known to history that created a government. It marked the beginnings of American democracy, of which Thomas Hooker deserves more than any other man to be called the father. The government of the United States today is in lineal descent more nearly related to that of Connecticut than to that of any of the other thirteen colonies.”

In recognition of this, on the wall of the narrow alleyway just outside the grounds near the Chelmsford Cathedral in Chelmsford, Essex, England, where he was town lecturer and curate, there is a Hooker Memorial Civic Plaque fixed high on the wall of the narrow alleyway, opposite the south porch, that reads: “Thomas Hooker, 1586 – 1647, Curate at St. Mary’s Church and Chelmsford Town Lecturer 1626-29. Founder of the State of Connecticut, Father of American Democracy.”

Thomas Hooker died during an “epidemical sickness” in 1647, at the age of 61. [More via Wikipedia][Iain Murray’s five part Banner of Truth series can be found here.]

The Works of Thomas Hooker

The Application of Redemption by the Effectual Work of the Word, and Spirit of Christ, for the Bringing Home of Lost Sinners to God. (702 pages)
[epub mobi txt web via EEBO]
The text is in rough shape. If you have some time and would like to help cleaning this up, let me know!

A Brief Exposition of the Lord’s Prayer. (91 pages)
[pdf web via Google Books]
Matthew 6:9-13.

The Christian’s Two Chief Lessons: Self-Denial and Self-Trial. (224 pages)
[pdf via Digital Puritan]
Containing the following:

  1. Heautonaparnumenos, or A Treatise of Self-Denial (Matthew 16:24) – pdf, 100 pp.
  2. A Treatise of Self-Trial (2 Corinthians 13:5) – pdf, 84 pp.
  3. The Privilege of Adoption and Trial Thereof by Regeneration (John 1:12-13) – pdf, 19 pp.

A Comment Upon Christ’s Last Prayer in the Seventeenth of John. (460 pages)
John 17:20-26.

The Covenant of Grace Opened. (88 pages)
Genesis 17:23.

The Danger of Desertion. (19 pages)

Jeremiah 14:9. The farewell sermon of Thomas Hooker.

The Faithful Covenanter. (46 pages)

A sermon preached at Dedham lecture in Essex, on Deuteronomy 29:24-25.

Four Learned and Godly Treatises. (298 pages)

Containing the following:

  1. The Carnal Hypocrite (2 Timothy 3:5).
  2. The Churches’ Deliverances (Judges 10:13).
  3. The Deceitfulness of Sin (Psalm 119:29).
  4. Heavy Afflictions Breed Earnest Prayers from the Wicked (Proverbs 1:28-29).

The Immortality of Man’s Soul Proved Both by Scripture and Reason. (48 pages)

The Pattern of Perfection Exhibited in God’s Image on Adam, and God’s Covenant Made with Him. (398 pages)

Containing:

  1. The Pattern of Perfection Exhibited in God’s Image on Adam, and God’s Covenant Made with Him (Genesis 1:26).
  2. The Prayer of Faith (James 1:6).
  3. A Preparative to the Lord’s Supper.
  4. The Character of a Sound Christian, in Seventeen Marks.

The Poor Doubting Christian Drawn to Christ. (159 pages)
[pdf epub web via Google Books]

The Saint’s Dignity and Duty. (266 pages)

Containing seven sermons:

  1. The Gift of Gifts (or, The End Why Christ Gave Himself, Titus 2:14).
  2. The Blessed Inhabitant (or, The Benefit of Christ’s Being in Believers, Romans 8:10).
  3. Grace Magnified (or, The Privileges of Those That are Under Grace, Romans 6:14).
  4. Wisdom’s Attendants (or, The Voice of Christ to Be Obeyed, Proverbs 8:32).
  5. The Activity of Faith (or, Abraham’s Imitators, Romans 4:12).
  6. Culpable Ignorance (or, The Danger of Ignorance Under Means, Isaiah 27:11).
  7. Willful Hardness (or, The Means of Grace Abused, Proverbs 29:1).

The Saint’s Guide in Three Treatises. (182 pages)

Containing:

  1. The Merror of Mercy (Genesis 6:13).
  2. The Carnal Man’s Condition (Romans 1:18).
  3. The Plantation of the Righteous (Psalm 1:3).

The Soul’s Exaltation. (351 pages)
[pdf epub mobi txt web via Internet Archive]
A treatise containing:

  1. The Soul’s Union with Christ (1 Corinthians 6:17) – pdf, 53 pp.
  2. The Soul’s Benefit from Union with Christ (1 Corinthians 1:30) – pdf, 75 pp.
  3. The Soul’s Justification (2 Corinthians 5:21) – pdf, 181 pp.
  4. The Soul’s Ingrafting into Christ (Malachi 3:1) – pdf, 30 pp.

An Exposition of the Principles of Religion. (62 pages)

The Soul’s Humiliation. (252 pages)

Luke 15:14-18.

The Soul’s Implantation. (290 pages)

Containing:

  1. The Broken Heart (Isaiah 57:15).
  2. The Preparing of the Heart to Receive Christ (Luke 1:17).
  3. The Soul’s Ingrafting into Christ (Malachi 3:1).
    Available above as part of The Soul’s Exaltation.
  4. Spiritual Love and Joy (Galatians 5:22).

The Soul’s Possession of Christ: Showing How a Christian Should Put on Christ, and Be Able to Do All Things Through His Strength. (248 pages)

Romans 13:4. Also includes the sermon “Spiritual Munition”, a funeral sermon for Mr. Wilmott on 2 Kings 2:12.

The Soul’s Preparation for Christ. (258 pages)
[pdf web via Google Books][epub mobi txt web via EEBO]
Acts 2:37. Subtitled “A Treatise of Contrition, Wherein is discovered How God breaks the Heart, and Wounds the Soul, in the Conversion of a Sinner to Himself”.

The Soul’s Vocation or Effectual Calling to Christ. (668 pages)

John 6:45.

A Survey of the Sum of Church Discipline. (480 pages)
[pdf epub mobi txt web via Internet Archive]
A series of treatises on church polity (government).

Three Godly Sermons. (144 pages)

Containing:

  1. The Wrath of God Against Sinners (Romans 1:18).
  2. The Striving of the Lord with Sinners (Genesis 6:3).
    or, A Godly and Profitable Sermon of God’s Eternity and Man’s Humanity.
  3. The Plantation of the Righteous (Psalm 1:3).

The Unbeliever’s Preparing for Christ. (342 pages)

A series of sermons:

  1. A sermon on Revelation 22:17.
  2. A sermon on 1 Corinthians 2:14.
  3. A sermon on Ezekiel 11:19.
  4. A sermon on Luke 19:42.
  5. A sermon on Matthew 20:3-6.
  6. Preparing for Christ (John 6:44).

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Born in Leicestershire, Hooker took his and at Cambridge

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Life [ edit | edit source ]

Thomas Hooker was likely born at Marefield or Birstall, Leicestershire, [4] and went to school at Market Bosworth. [5]  In March 1604, he entered Queen's College, Cambridge as a scholarship student. [6]  He received hisBachelor of Arts from Emmanuel College, Cambridge in 1608, continuing there to earn his Master of Arts in 1611. [5][7][8]  He stayed at Emmanuel as a fellow for a few years. [5]  After his stay at Emmanuel, Hooker preached at the Esher parish sometime between 1618-20, where he earned a reputation as an excellent speaker. [5][8]  and became famous for his pastoral care of Mrs. Joan Drake, a depressive whose stages of spiritual regeneration became a model for his later theological thinking. While associated with the Drake household, he also met and married Susannah Garbrand, Mrs. Drake's woman-in-waiting (April 3, 1621) in Amersham, Mrs. Drake's own birthplace. [9]

Around 1626, Hooker became a lecturer or preacher at what was then St. Mary's parish church, Chelmsford (now the Chelmsford Cathedral) and curate to its rector, John Michaelson. [5]  However, in 1629 Archbishop William Laudsuppressed church lecturers, and Hooker was forced to retire to Little Baddow. [5]  His leadership of Puritan sympathizers brought him a summons to the Court of High Commission. Forfeiting his bond, Hooker fled toRotterdam (the Netherlands, [8]  and for a time considered a position in the English reformed church in Amsterdam, as assistant to its senior paster, the Rev. John Paget. [10]  From Holland, after a final clandestine trip to England to put his affairs in order, [11]  he immigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony aboard the Griffin. [1][5]

Hooker arrived in Boston and settled in Newtown (later renamed Cambridge), where he became the pastor of the earliest established church there, known to its members as "The Church of Christ at Cambridge."  [12]  His congregation, some of whom may have been members of congregations he had served in England, [13]  became known as "Mr. Hooker's Company". [5]

Voting in Massachusetts was limited to freemen, individuals who had been formally admitted to their church after a detailed interrogation of their religious views and experiences. Hooker disagreed with this limitation of suffrage, putting him at odds with the influential pastor John Cotton. Owing to his conflict with Cotton and discontented with the suppression of Puritan suffrage and at odds with the colony leadership, [8] Hooker and the Rev. Samuel Stone led a group of about 100 [14]  who, in 1636, founded the settlement of Hartford, named for Stone’s place of birth: Hertford, in England. [15]

This led to the founding of the Connecticut Colony. [5][16]  Hooker became more active in politics in Connecticut. The General Court representing Wethersfield, Windsor and Hartford met at the end of May 1638 to frame a written constitution in order to establish a government for the commonwealth. Hooker preached the opening sermon at First Church of Hartford on May 31, declaring that "the foundation of authority is laid in the free consent of the people." [17]

On January 14, 1639, freemen from these three settlements ratified the "Fundamental Orders of Connecticut" in what John Fiske called "the first written constitution known to history that created a government. It marked the beginnings of American democracy, of which Thomas Hooker deserves more than any other man to be called the father. The government of the United States today is in lineal descent more nearly related to that of Connecticut than to that of any of the other thirteen colonies." [18]

In recognition of this, on the wall of the narrow alleyway just outside the grounds near the Chelmsford Cathedral inChelmsford, Essex, England, where he was town lecturer and curate, there is a Blue Plaque fixed high on the wall of the narrow alleyway, opposite the south porch, that reads: "Thomas Hooker, 1586 - 1647, Curate at St. Mary’s Church and Chelmsford Town Lecturer 1626-29. Founder of the State of Connecticut, Father of American Democracy." [19]

The Rev. Hooker died during an "epidemical sickness" in 1647, at the age of 61. The location of his grave is unknown, although he is believed to be buried in Hartford's Ancient Burying Ground. Because there was no known portrait of him, the statue of him that stands nearby, in front of Hartford’s Old State House, was sculpted from the likenesses of his descendants. However, the city is not without a sense of humor regarding its origins. Each year, organizations and citizens of Hartford dress up in outrageous costumes to celebrate Hooker Day with the Hooker Day Parade. T-shirts sold in the Old State House proclaim "Hartford was founded by a Hooker."


Census records can tell you a lot of little known facts about your Hooker Thomas ancestors, such as occupation. Occupation can tell you about your ancestor's social and economic status.

There are 3,000 census records available for the last name Hooker Thomas. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Hooker Thomas census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 642 immigration records available for the last name Hooker Thomas. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name Hooker Thomas. For the veterans among your Hooker Thomas ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 3,000 census records available for the last name Hooker Thomas. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Hooker Thomas census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 642 immigration records available for the last name Hooker Thomas. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name Hooker Thomas. For the veterans among your Hooker Thomas ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


Hooker was born in Hadley, Massachusetts, the grandson of a captain in the American Revolutionary War. His initial schooling was at the local Hopkins Academy. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1837, ranked 29th out of a class of 50, and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 1st U.S. Artillery His initial assignment was in Florida fighting in the second of the Seminole Wars. He served in the Mexican-American War in staff positions in the campaigns of both Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott. He received brevet promotions for his staff leadership and gallantry in three battles: Monterrey (to captain), National Bridge (major), and Chapultepec (lieutenant colonel). His future Army reputation as a ladies’ man began in Mexico, where local girls referred to him as the “Handsome Captain”.

After the war, he served as assistant adjutant general of the Pacific Division, but resigned his commission in 1853 his military reputation had been damaged when he testified against his former commander, General Scott, in the court-martial for insubordination of Gideon Pillow. Hooker settled in Sonoma County, California, as a farmer and land developer, but was more devoted to gambling and liquor than to agriculture. His house still exists in the city of Sonoma. When living in Sonoma, he stood for election to represent the region in the California legislature but was defeated by James Bennett of Santa Rosa. He was obviously unhappy and unsuccessful in his civilian pursuits because, in 1858, he wrote to Secretary of War John B. Floyd to request that his name “be presented to the president Buchanan as a candidate for a lieutenant colonelcy”, but nothing came of his request. From 1859 to 1861, he held a commission as a colonel in the California militia.


Watch the video: Thomas Hooker (December 2021).